Hip-Hop Beefs and Andy Warhol’s Memes: 5 Things to Know in Pop Culture Today

Hip-Hop Beefs and Andy Warhol’s Memes: 5 Things to Know in Pop Culture Today

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Hello! Welcome to your daily roundup of what’s going on in pop culture.

I can’t stop thinking about this interview Vanity Fair did with Billie Eilish, asking her the same questions they did a year ago, and editing her answers side by side. The past year saw the now-16-year-old’s music explode in popularity. Seeing both how her life has changed and how she looks back at her younger self is a very stark portrait of how sudden fame and attention can feel.

There have been hip-hop beefs since time immemorial, but now stars can use so many more platforms to get their points across. Cardi B and Nicki Minaj have been leveraging them all — Instagram, internet radio, Twitter — and the rivalry between Drake and Pusha T hasn’t been confined to music, either. Jon Caramanica breaks down how the landscape is changing.

Netflix’s “The Haunting of Hill House” is very scary, and not just in a haunted-house way. Many critics (including The Times’s Jason Zinoman) zeroed in on Episode 6 as the series’ best, and the show’s creator, Mike Flanagan, wrote a great thread on Twitter breaking down how 51 minutes of the episode consisted of just five shots, calling it “the hardest thing most of us have ever done.”

Bob Dylan’s “Blood on the Tracks” is the focus of his latest Bootleg Series box set, called “More Blood, More Tracks,” and I applaud whoever made that decision. The set “unveils all of the initial sessions,” writes the pop music critic Jon Pareles, as well as “Up to Me,” a song that Dylan wrote for the album but didn’t include. Over at The Ringer, Steven Hyden imagines how the track could fit into Luca Guadagnino’s upcoming movie adaptation of the album.

There’s a lot of interesting stuff (but too much Andy Cohen) in this video from the Whitney Museum about Andy Warhol and our current pop-culture landscape. Were Warhol’s screenprints essentially memes? Was living his life wearing a camera and a tape recorder foreshadowing our phone addiction? How happy would he be to know that a huge retrospective of his work is about to open at the Whitney? (Yes, probably, and extremely.)

Both “Shrek” and “Puss in Boots” are getting reboots, fueled by the man behind “Despicable Me,” Chris Meledandri. “There’s a tremendous amount of fun to be had in that world,” he told Variety, adding, “You want to find something in the narrative that really feels like a departure.”

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